Skip to main content
Menu

Posts tagged with "Drug Assays"

  • Biological News

    A Condensate-Modifying Compound, Put to the Test

    I’ve written several times here about phase-separated condensates in cells, but now comes a rarity: a paper with some evidence for a therapeutic application. Everyone in the field has been thinking along such lines, naturally, but this is the first small-molecule screen that I’ve seen that tries to tie modifying condensate behavior in t… Read More
  • Biological News

    Slow Down That Protein’s Travel Plans

    Here’s a new look at the various ways that small molecules can affect a well-known drug target (the estrogen receptor) and it shows us that we’re all going to have to look at these things more carefully than we do. Now, to be fair, the ER is already fairly complicated, because it’s a nuclear receptor. Read More
  • Biological News

    Unstuck Proteins

    This is a pretty interesting paper on several levels. It sheds light on Mucin I kidney disease (MKD), on protein degradation pathways (a hot topic these days, as those in the industry well know), and it also provides a small molecule lead compound. It’s a large multicenter team, starting off with the Broad Institute, but… Read More
  • Drug Assays

    Lilly’s Virtual Med-Chem Assistant

    Here’s an interesting new paper from Lilly (brought to my attention by Ash Jogalekar on Twitter). “Creating a virtual assistant for medicinal chemistry” is the title, but fear not: this is not something that’s come to elbow you aside at the bench. Well, not yet. What they’re talking about is a software agent that is… Read More
  • Chemical News

    The Cyclofluidic Story

    The recent post here on automation in chemistry (especially medicinal chemistry) is a good intro for this paper in ACS Med. Chem. Letters. It’s from David Parry, who led Cyclofluidic, and I’ve blogged about them a few times over the years. That was a company formed in 2008 in the UK to try to develop… Read More
  • Animal Testing

    Enough With the Mouse Behavioral Models?

    This piece in STAT is well worth a read. The author, Adam Rosenberg of Rodin Therapeutics, is ready to ditch rodent-centric models for human CNS disease, and I can see where he’s coming from. I’ve often said that when I think back on my Alzheimer’s and schizophrenia drug discovery days (back when I was first… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    Making Some New Compounds, to Fit Some New Receptors

    Here’s some medicinal chemistry combined with synthetic biology for you. Many people are used to thinking in terms of finding small-molecule probes for various cell targets, and those are valuable things. But what if you want to control a certain population of (for example) ion channels, but there aren’t any compounds that will do the… Read More
  • Cancer

    Making and Measuring Multivalency

    Here’s an unusual paper that’s studying receptor behavior on cell surfaces by use of atomic force microscopy. (Here’s the SI file, which is free to access). The authors took the marketed VEGF inhibitor vandetanib (VD6474) and attached it through linkers to the AFM tip, and then scanned around the surface of live human umbilical v… Read More
  • Drug Assays

    Comparing Compound Collections

    A common question – well, it should be a common question, anyway – is “How do I make sure that this compound collection is a useful one to screen?” There are alternative forms that come down to the same issues – if you’re putting together a new focused screening set, what should be in it?… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    A Close Look at Fragments

    Here’s a look from the D. E. Shaw research team at fragment binding, and even if you don’t do fragment-based drug discovery, it’s worth a read. That’s because the mechanisms by which fragments bind to proteins are most likely the fundamental ones by which larger molecules bind as well; this is the reductionist look at… Read More
123...