Skip to Content

Posts tagged with "Infectious Diseases"

  • Biological News

    The Secret Life of the Insulin Receptor

    You’d think that we would understand the workings of something like the insulin receptor by now, wouldn’t you? I worked in the metabolic disease area for several years, and I can give you the canonical version of its activities as it relates to insulin levels and glucose handling out in the canonical tissues (muscle, adipose). Read More
  • Alzheimer's Disease

    A New Infectious Mechanism for Alzheimer’s?

    We have another entry in the “Is Alzheimer’s caused by infectious disease?” drawing, and it’s a good one. A large multicenter team reports that Porphyromonas gingivalis, which is the key pathogen in gingivitis (gum disease) may be the actual causative agent in Alzheimer’s, which is a bold claim indeed. But they have… Read More
  • Biological News

    Quinine’s Target

    Every “history of pharmaceuticals” article ever written probably mentions quinine, and well they should. (I certainly reserved an entry for it while writing my own chemical history book). It’s a classic example of a natural product drug, one that was not known to the classical Mediterranean world but was only appreciated by Europe… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    Artemisia Comes Through Again

    Here’s an unusual twist for you. Many readers will be familiar – to their regret, most likely – with the story of T*ring Pharmaceuticals (name redacted slightly in order to not defame a great scientist whose name was tacked on to this outfit for no reason other than advertising). Their first idea was to go… Read More
  • Biological News

    Rewiring Bacteria

    Earth is basically a bacteria planet, despite humankind’s naked-eye-level profile. They’ve been here unfathomably longer than we have, they live in plenty of places where we can’t survive, and their biomass far outranks ours. This paper will show you just how adaptable the little creatures are. Wild-type E. coli (like many other… Read More
  • Infectious Diseases

    Vaccines Against a Vanishing Virus?

    Vaccines can be one of the most powerful and effective public health interventions, as experiences with smallpox and polio make clear. But vaccine development itself is quite difficult, which is why there are (relatively) few vaccines out there. Look at dengue, for example: it’s a longstanding viral problem in tropical areas, and would seem… Read More
  • Drug Assays

    A New Antibiotic? Yes, Please

    New antibiotics against resistant Gram-negative bacteria make me happy, so I’m very glad to see this report from Genentech. They’ve been doing a lot of work on an antibiotic scaffold (arylomycins, Update: on a program that came in whey they bought RQx) which had not thus far really found much practical use, and it looks… Read More
  • Biological News

    Switching On Innate Immunity

    Cells couldn’t have a hope of working if they weren’t tightly spatially organized. The nucleus vs. the cytosol (and the cell membrane itself) are the two most obvious partitions, and then you have specialized organelles like the mitochondria, et very much cetera, dividing things further. Life itself is organized around things being diff… Read More
  • Current Events

    Deliberate Vaccine Misinformation

    Over on my Twitter feed, which veers off-topic a bit more often than this blog, I had a series of tweets the other day about troll/bot accounts. And as fate would have it, that very subject now intersects more closely with a focus on biomedical news. This new paper in the American Journal of Public… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    In Situ Click Chemistry For Antibiotics

    I have always had a liking for the technique of having target proteins assemble their own inhibitors. This goes under several names: target-guided synthesis or protein-templated reactions more generally, and in situ click chemistry when the triazole/alkyne reaction is used as the assembly method. But the idea is the same in each case. You bring… Read More
123...