Skip to main content
Menu

Posts tagged with "Infectious Diseases"

  • Covid-19

    Famotidine, Histamine, and the Coronavirus

    Here’s a new preprint on a drug-repurposing effort that many people have been wondering about: famotidine, the histamine antagonist that is sold under the brand name of Pepcid. There have been some retrospective data that have suggested that famotidine use can have a beneficial effect on the course of the disease, and a controlled trial… Read More
  • Covid-19

    Coronavirus Vaccine Update, May 26

    We have a lot more vaccine news to catch up on, and I’ll use this as a new “frontrunning vaccine candidates” post, replacing this one (and updates therein) from about a month back. That one will give you some more general information on most of the projects below; if you haven’t read it, it’ll be a… Read More
  • Covid-19

    Hydroxychloroquine: Enough Already?

    Update, and it’s a big one: this paper has now been retracted by the authors, who say that they are “unable to vouch for the veracity of the primary data”. None of its conclusions can be regarded as valid. Read on for historical interest only! But note that this is not the only evidence against… Read More
  • Covid-19

    There May Be a Unique Coronavirus Immune Response

    We’re starting to get a clearer picture of how the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus works when it infects the body, and there are some surprises emerging. This new paper in Cell is an example (here’s a writeup on it at Stat). We already know the RNA sequence of the virus very well, naturally, and that’s allowing us… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    First Results from Moderna’s Coronavirus Vaccine

    This morning brought news from Moderna of the very first human results from trials of their closely-watched mRNA vaccine candidate (mRNA-1273) against the coronavirus. Here’s Stat on the news, and here’s Endpts – the results can be summed up pretty quickly, because it’s all just at the press-release level to start with. The… Read More
  • Covid-19

    Criticism of the Oxford Coronavirus Vaccine

    This piece at Forbes by Bill Haseltine has set off a lot of comment – it’s a look at the Oxford group’s vaccine candidate as compared to the SinoVac candidate, and you may recall (background here) that these are the two teams that have separately reported that their vaccines appear to protect rhesus monkeys from… Read More
  • Covid-19

    Good News on the Human Immune Response to the Coronavirus

    One of the big (and so far unanswered) questions about the coronavirus epidemic is what kind of immunity people have after becoming infected. This is important for the idea of “re-infection” (is it even possible?) and of course for vaccine development. We’re getting more and more information in this area, though, and this new pape… Read More
  • Covid-19

    Monoclonal Antibodies and Vaccines: Q and A

    I’ve had a lot of questions from people about the prospects for monoclonal antibodies and vaccines against the coronavirus, and I thought that it might be helpful to answer them in this format. Let’s start the press conference! We’ll start with monoclonal antibodies. Why are you so optimistic that this technology will work? Two bi… Read More
  • Covid-19

    More Chinese Traditional Medicine, Unfortunately

    I mentioned the other day that what was reported as a hydroxychloroquine trial in China may well have been (or at least begun as) a trial of “traditional Chinese medicine” (TCM). It doesn’t take much digging to turn up a number of registered clinical trials for coronavirus therapy via TCM, actually. Here are a few… Read More
  • Covid-19

    What’s Up With Ivermectin?

    One of the small-molecule drugs that’s getting attention as a possible coronavirus treatment is Ivermectin, which is an interesting story from a couple of different directions. I’ve been getting some inquiries about it, so I thought it was time to have a look. Background on Ivermectin It’s part of a family of natural products call… Read More
123...