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Posts tagged with "Pharmacokinetics"

  • Chemical News

    Silicon In Drug Molecules, Revisited

    Here’s an update to a post from last year about silicon in drug-like molecules. The Denmark group at Illinois has investigated a range of silicon-containing heterocycles, providing both synthetic routes into the (mostly unknown) structures, and looking at some basic pharmaceutically relevant properties. There’s a lot of work in this pap… Read More
  • Drug Assays

    Pharmacokinetic Advice From Genentech

    Here’s another solid pharmacokinetics paper, this one from Genentech, with advice on how to extend drug half-life (compare this other recent one). They’re specifically addressing the “make it less lipophilic” rule of thumb that many medicinal chemists have, and they demonstrate that this isn’t exactly a universal law.… Read More
  • Drug Assays

    Pharmacokinetic Advice from Merck’s Collection

    Here’s a solid med-chem paper from Merck on the topic of extending half-life for small-molecule drugs. This obviously is most important (and can have the biggest effect) if your compound has a short half-life after dosing to begin with (and plenty of compounds do). As the paper notes, if you have constant clearance for the… Read More
  • Cardiovascular Disease

    Inhaled Nanoparticles – Good Ones, That Is

    Never give up on drug delivery ideas – that’s one of the big points I get out of this paper. The authors, part of a multi-center team from sites in Italy and Germany, have previously shown that calcium phosphate nanoparticles could be a good carrier for delicate cargo such as microRNAs. Such things tend to… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Two Molecules, When You Were Expecting Just One

    Here’s a good short review on a subject that doesn’t come up too often in drug discovery, but can be a major headache when it does: atropisomerism. There are all sorts of structural isomers possible for organic compounds, and students in their second-year class have a joyful time learning them and keeping them straight. But… Read More
  • Animal Testing

    Melanocortin: It’s Not Just For Lizards Any More

    If you’re looking for a good example of evolution-as-a-tinkerer, the melanocortin receptors would be a good place to start. From a single starting point, they’ve ended up as a family of related proteins that do completely different things. And the hormones that bind to them have radiated out as well: they’re all derived by process… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    Poke Holes Through Your Membranes. It’s Fun.

    The cell membrane – the fundamental architecture of living things, the foundation of how our very bodies are organized – is a major pain in the behind. I express this ungrateful opinion merely because over the years it has rejected entry to some of my best ideas for drug candidates, and I bear a grudge. Read More
  • Biological News

    Small Proteins: Into the Gap

    We medicinal chemists are used to thinking about small molecule drugs – it’s what we do. And we’re also comfortable with having a category in our worldview that we assign to “biologics” – proteins, mostly, many of them antibodies, which can also be extremely therapeutically effective under the right conditions. B… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    Silicon Stays in the Shadows

    I like this review, but I’ve seen it before. Well, not this exact manuscript, but every few years it seems there’s another one with a similar title, something about “Incorporating Silicon Into Drug Structures”. I am guilty of the exact same thing, though: here’s a blog post from 2004 on the topic, and here’s one… Read More
  • Pharmacokinetics

    There’s Toxicity, And There’s Toxicity

    This is a neat article at Bloomberg about the production of botulinum toxin (BTX, aka Botox). This is a drug that has some rather special handling involved: A baby-aspirin-size amount of powdered toxin is enough to make the global supply of Botox for a year. That little bit is derived from a larger primary source… Read More
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