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Posts tagged with "The Scientific Literature"

  • In Silico

    Machine-Mining the Literature

    We’ve made it to the point – a while back, actually – where people who actually know the subject roll their eyes a bit when the term “artificial intelligence” is used without some acknowledgment that it’s not very useful. I think that’s a real sign that it’s becoming useful. Things are to the point wh… Read More
  • General Scientific News

    Publication Rankings

    I enjoyed looking through the Nature Indexes section recently in that journal – I believe that they do this primarily as a way to make a new section in which to sell advertisements, to be honest, but the content itself is worth a look. They’re tracking publications in 82 leading scientific journals and looking for… Read More
  • The Scientific Literature

    Plan S Is Still Coming

    It’s been a few months since I wrote about “Plan S”, the far-reaching effort by several European governments to require open-access publication for scientific projects that they fund. Since this was announced last fall, the whole scientific publishing world has been trying to deal with the potential consequences, authors and publi… Read More
  • Biological News

    Antibody Design, Publicly Challenged

    Comes now some rather disturbing news in the antibody field. These things are extremely important, both as therapeutics and as research reagents, and developing them for either purpose is no stroll down the garden walk. There are a number of techniques for raising and producing antibodies (see that first link), but they all have their… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    Myristoylation Probes, Rethought

    The need for good chemical probes continues, and (sadly) so does the use of crappy ones. That’s what I took away from this recent paper from a multicenter team out of London. They’re looking at commonly used probes for inhibition of N-myristoyltransferase (NMT) enzymes, and it’s one of those good-news/bad-news situations. N-myrist… Read More
  • The Dark Side

    Too Much Wasted Time

    Here’s a note of warning sounded in a lead editorial in Nature: . . .I think that, in two decades, we will look back on the past 60 years — particularly in biomedical science — and marvel at how much time and money has been wasted on flawed research. . . . . .many researchers… Read More
  • The Scientific Literature

    Flipping Through the Pages

    I’m traveling today, but as I was scrolling through my RSS feeds on the plane (OK, yeah, I know, but they had free Wi-Fi and why not), I thought about how people of around my scientific generation, maybe a bit younger and certainly the older ones, often talk about how they miss flipping through the… Read More
  • Snake Oil

    More Quackery

    Yep, folks, we’re doing it wrong. Making these small molecules, these biologics, all of it – we worry about pharmacokinetics and exposure, about side effects and potency and selectivity, and all the time we could be dosing folks with magic water. That’s what you’d get out of reading the literature on “release-active dr… Read More
  • Animal Testing

    An Expensive Choice for Duke

    You may have seen the headlines about a large settlement ($112.5 million) that Duke University is paying the government. This goes back to Erin Potts-Kant, a clinical research coordinator at Duke Health, as well as (former) professor William Foster and (former) chief of the Pulmonary Division Monica Kraft. The details are many, and some of them… Read More
  • The Scientific Literature

    California Tells Elsevier to Take a Hike

    The science publishing struggles are not calming down – just the opposite. As of yesterday, the entire University of California system is no longer subscribing to Elsevier journals. That’s a mighty big university system and a mighty big publisher; this is Godzilla vs. Megalon. The dispute is around two mighty big issues as well. The… Read More
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