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Posts tagged with "The Scientific Literature"

  • General Scientific News

    Cutting Back On Lousy Conferences

    I’ve written before about the lowest tier of scientific conferences, the ones that are basically “presentation mills” for people to pad their CVs with. Now I see that South Korea is actively discouraging professors from attending such things. The Education Ministry is requiring a checklist form and vetting by each university to ma… Read More
  • The Scientific Literature

    Nonsense Lives On in the Citations

    It’s apparent to anyone who’s familiar with the scientific literature that citations to other papers are not exactly an ideal system. It’s long been one of the currencies of publication, since highly-cited work clearly stands out as having been useful to others and more visible in the scientific community (the great majority of pa… Read More
  • The Scientific Literature

    Scientific Prose

    Many folks have noted this advice from well-known novelist Cormac McCarthy on writing scientific papers, usually with a sense of disbelief that he has anything to do with scientific papers at all. I felt the same way, but he’s been associated with the Santa Fe Institute (physics and math) for some years now, and has… Read More
  • The Dark Side

    Cite My Papers. Or Else.

    The ways to mess around with the peer-review process are legion, but these schemes are getting a bit easier to catch. That’s what I take away from this paper, from two bibliographic scientists at Elsevier who set up a system to do just that. One hears tales of reviewers who will look more favorably on… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Not All Of Those Compounds Are Real. Again.

    The Nrf2 pathway has been a hot area of research for some years now, particularly in oncology. It’s a basic-leucine-zipper transcription factor that under normal conditions stays mostly out in the cytosol, where it’s under tight regulatory control. Under cellular stress, though, it heads into the nucleus and fulfills its transcription-f… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Robotic Flow Synthesis: The Latest Version

    Here’s another step along the way to automated synthesis, in a new paper from MIT. The eventual hope is to unite the software and the hardware in this area, both of which are developing these days, and come up with a system that can produce new compounds with a minimum of human intervention. Let’s stipulate… Read More
  • Business and Markets

    Startups And Their Publications

    How much does scientific publication matter? For once, we’re not going to be talking about its role in academia (partly because it obviously means quite a bit there!) No, how much does it matter in industry? Specifically, at highly valued biomedical startups? That’s the subject of this new paper by John Ioannides and co-authors, and… Read More
  • In Silico

    Text-Mining: Preparing for Battle in India

    Since I was just blogging the other day about a machine-learning paper that worked its way through decades of abstracts for materials science papers, this news is timely. Carl Malamud and a team at Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi have assembled a rather huge repository of journal articles (they’re aiming for about 73 million of… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Acronym Fever. We Need an Acronym For That.

    The Wall Street Journal published a provocative article the other day, entitled “Don’t Understand Moronic Bromides?” about the proliferation over the years of acronyms in science.(Note the old-fashioned usage of “bromide” derived from the early sleeping pills). And while it’s a cranky piece, it’s not wrong. Read More
  • In Silico

    Machine-Mining the Literature

    We’ve made it to the point – a while back, actually – where people who actually know the subject roll their eyes a bit when the term “artificial intelligence” is used without some acknowledgment that it’s not very useful. I think that’s a real sign that it’s becoming useful. Things are to the point wh… Read More
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