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Posts tagged with "The Scientific Literature"

  • The Scientific Literature

    Flipping Through the Pages

    I’m traveling today, but as I was scrolling through my RSS feeds on the plane (OK, yeah, I know, but they had free Wi-Fi and why not), I thought about how people of around my scientific generation, maybe a bit younger and certainly the older ones, often talk about how they miss flipping through the… Read More
  • Snake Oil

    More Quackery

    Yep, folks, we’re doing it wrong. Making these small molecules, these biologics, all of it – we worry about pharmacokinetics and exposure, about side effects and potency and selectivity, and all the time we could be dosing folks with magic water. That’s what you’d get out of reading the literature on “release-active dr… Read More
  • Animal Testing

    An Expensive Choice for Duke

    You may have seen the headlines about a large settlement ($112.5 million) that Duke University is paying the government. This goes back to Erin Potts-Kant, a clinical research coordinator at Duke Health, as well as (former) professor William Foster and (former) chief of the Pulmonary Division Monica Kraft. The details are many, and some of them… Read More
  • The Scientific Literature

    California Tells Elsevier to Take a Hike

    The science publishing struggles are not calming down – just the opposite. As of yesterday, the entire University of California system is no longer subscribing to Elsevier journals. That’s a mighty big university system and a mighty big publisher; this is Godzilla vs. Megalon. The dispute is around two mighty big issues as well. The… Read More
  • General Scientific News

    Large Teams and Small Ones in Science

    I had a book review recently in Nature, on a new volume (Thrifty Science) that looks over the history of early scientific experimentation from the viewpoint of its frugal nature – the idea of reusing and repurposing equipment, objects, and even rooms in one’s house. There was indeed a lot of this sort of thing… Read More
  • The Dark Side

    Systematic Fraud

    Here’s a personal experience with fraudulent scientific literature, as reported in Nature: In 2015, I discovered several papers had been written about a gene that I and my colleagues first reported in 1998. All were by different authors based in China, but contained shared and strange irregularities. They also used highly similar language and… Read More
  • The Scientific Literature

    CA Days

    A brief discussion the other day on Twitter got me to thinking about the lost world of literature searching – back when everything was bound journals and paper. My whole grad school career took place in the pre-PDF world, and a good part of it was pre-CAS Online. So those of you from that era… Read More
  • Academia (vs. Industry)

    Industrial Manuscripts Not Welcome

    Update: see the comments section. The editors of the journal are calling this “a highly unusual and unfortunate error” and are taking steps to correct it. Now, this is a situation that I haven’t seen mentioned before. A reader (from one division of a large pharma company that I won’t name) had prepared a manuscript… Read More
  • The Scientific Literature

    The EU Open Access Fight Continues

    I wrote here about a European plan to mandate open-access scientific publication – one whose sweep many found startling when it was proposed. And some of the ones who were startled were researchers themselves, it seems – here’s an open letter opposing the plan as written. Chemists seem to be among those leading the charge… Read More
  • Chemical News

    CDK Inhibitors: Purchase With Caution

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDKs) have been drug targets for quite a while now. There are 20 different ones, and they help to regulate a whole list of important functions, particularly involving the cell cycle (which has made them of great interest in oncology research). There are three approved drugs in the area so far: Kisqali (ribociclib)… Read More
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