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Posts tagged with "Uncategorized"

  • Sweet Almonds: One Amino Acid Did the Trick

    Well, I spent the holiday weekend here sending out pictures of food on my Twitter account, so I suppose it’s only fitting that I blog about a related topic today. But it also touches on metabolic enzymes, transcription factors, and death by cyanide, so there’s something for most everyone. I refer to this paper which… Read More
  • Fast Pain Relief – In Only Seven Million Years

    Here’s a chemical descriptor that I didn’t know: algogen, meaning a molecule that causes pain. I would have classified the natural product I did my PhD work on as one, since it caused me substantial pain at the time, but this term refers more properly to physical nociceptive types of pain, rather than the intellectual… Read More
  • Animal Testing

    Autism Mouse Models for the Microbiome?

    Many readers will have seen the paper that just came out on a possible mouse-model demonstration of a connection between autism and the gut microbiome. It’s certainly generated a lot of headlines, and its very title guaranteed that it would: “Human Gut Microbiota from Autism Spectrum Disorder Promote Behavioral Symptoms in Mice“.… Read More
  • Aging and Lifespan

    VCAM1 As a Player in the Aging Brain

    Possible intervention targets for age-related degeneration are always welcome, particularly when they come bearing experimental evidence, and even more so when they relate to the central nervous system. That’s the case with this new paper, from a multicenter team led out of Stanford. Interestingly, this also ties in with the well-publicized … Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Vibrational Modes, For Real

    I suppose I deserve this one. Some years ago on the blog, I wrote about my days in grad school having to learn about symmetries and vibrational spectroscopy. Sparingly has that knowledge come in handy since then, but the course is still a vivid memory for me, since that’s the clearest example I had yet… Read More
  • Animal Testing

    An Expensive Choice for Duke

    You may have seen the headlines about a large settlement ($112.5 million) that Duke University is paying the government. This goes back to Erin Potts-Kant, a clinical research coordinator at Duke Health, as well as (former) professor William Foster and (former) chief of the Pulmonary Division Monica Kraft. The details are many, and some of them… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    Sneaking Proteins Into Cells

    Now here’s a weird and rather startling paper. One of the things that people in this line of work spend a lot of time on is getting things into living cells. Small molecules often slide in, one way or another (although, to be honest, our detailed understanding of how they do that could use some… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    What Those Degraders Are Actually Doing

    Since targeted protein degradation is such a hot topic these days, this paper (which adds to the results obtained by this one) should get some interest. It’s a report of a detailed look at the kinetic behavior of several bifunctional degraders – and there’s a lot of kinetic behavior to look at. That’s because you’re l… Read More
  • Drug Assays

    Virtual Screening – As Big As It Currently Gets

    This new paper on “ultra-large” virtual screening is well worth a look in detail. We find a great many lead compounds in this business by random screening of compound libraries, and virtual screening is (as the name implies) the technique of doing this computationally instead of with hundreds (thousands) of sample plates and tireless ro… Read More
  • Business and Markets

    The Clinic Giveth And Most Definitely Taketh Away

    There have been some pretty dramatic clinical trial results coming out recently, and unfortunately drama is a variable that can take either a positive or a negative sign in front of it. On the plus side, MacroGenix, a company that not many people had been paying attention to, announced results of a head-to-head trial of… Read More
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