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  • Biological News

    Tumor-Specific Antigens From Way Out There

    The pileup in immuno-oncology is already the stuff of legend: it’s difficult to even count the number of therapies, combinations, and clinical trials that are underway or in development. And that’s for good reason, of course – the promise here is huge, the field is wide open, and there are vast tracts of things that… Read More
  • Chemical News

    Ah, Just Pour It Into Salt Water

    Today’s post is one for my fellow organic chemists to wonder over. This new paper from a group at the University of Bari describes a palladium-catalyzed coupling reaction of alkyllithiums and aryl halides. And that in itself is not that remarkable – it’s not easy to get that combination to go, not least because you might… Read More
  • The Scientific Literature

    CA Days

    A brief discussion the other day on Twitter got me to thinking about the lost world of literature searching – back when everything was bound journals and paper. My whole grad school career took place in the pre-PDF world, and a good part of it was pre-CAS Online. So those of you from that era… Read More
  • Business and Markets

    Worse Than Useless

    Time for another look at AbbVie’s work on Rova-T (an antibody-drug conjugate targeting the tumor antigen DLL3), and for some hard thoughts about what drug development is really like. The last time I wrote about this program, things didn’t look good. Now they look even worse. A Phase III trial of the drug has been… Read More
  • Cancer

    Mannose and Cancer

    I’m always happy to see something show up in the research literature that can be immediately applied in clinical practice. Working in drug discovery, you get used to everything maybe having an impact years in the future, if everything works out (and it rarely does!) So when you see an actionable idea that applies to… Read More
  • Business and Markets

    Whatever Happened to Insourcing? The Case of AMRI/Lilly

    Albany Molecular (AMRI) has been a big name in contract research for many years now. They’ve had a lot of twists and turns in their history, including being taken private a couple of years ago after having taken on a good deal of debt by acquiring other companies in turn. But it sounds like they’re… Read More
  • In Silico

    The Latest on Protein Folding

    The results of the biannual CASP (Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction) effort have been released. This is a widely-watched competition between different groups (and different programs, methods, hardware, etc.) to see how well protein structures can be predicted de novo from just the protein sequences themselves. In the main category, the or… Read More
  • Business and Markets

    Big Cuts at Bayer

    So the Bayer/Monsanto deal has gone through, and its sequel is exactly what you think it is: job cuts. About 10% of the company’s global work force is being let go. As some readers may know, I’ve already experienced the joys of losing a job as a result of a big Bayer move (in my… Read More
  • Alzheimer's Disease

    The Genomics of Neurons. And Alzheimer’s. And Everything Else.

    The brain is a complicated organ. Let’s start there. It’s complicated at every level that you care to examine, and if you get down to the genomic sequences of individual neurons, it’s worse than ever. The sheer variety of neurons and other cell types is quite extreme, and a lot of work over the years… Read More
  • Biological News

    After Such Knowledge

    So now we know more about the CRISPR human baby story. And it’s even worse than it looked. Let me recommend this report from Sharon Begley at Stat, from the International Human Genome Summit in Hong Kong, but it’s not going to make you happy to read it. It turns out that He Jiankui devoted quite… Read More
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