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  • Drug Assays

    Down Amongst the Water Molecules

    This new paper shows one reason why it’s so tricky to calculate compound binding in an active site (which is what we’d want to do in order to do effective in silico virtual screening). The authors (a multicenter team from York, Demuris, Vernalis, and St. Jude) are looking at a virulence protein from H. influenzae… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    An AI-Generated Drug?

    There were some headlines the other day about the “first AI-discovered drug”, so that should send us to the work in question to see what’s going on. The company in question is called Deep Genomics, and here’s what its founder has to say: “Making drugs has traditionally been a gambling game. Big Pharma is throwing… Read More
  • Blog Housekeeping

    I have a lot of interesting topics backed up ready to go, but unfortunately there’s been too much going on today for a full blog post. I’ll see everyone on Monday! Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    Adaptive Trials

    There are a lot of clinical trial designs out there. But one thing that a lot of them have in common is that they are designed right from the start to run under certain set conditions and to enroll a set number of people (or at least to meet certain thresholds before that enrollment is… Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    What’s Crucial And What Isn’t

    One of the reasons that people in or near this business can write such gaudy press releases is that it has so many moving parts. That lets everyone claim that the part that they’re addressing is Crucial. Think of a car: the wheels are indeed key to mobility, but so is the engine. As is… Read More
  • Analytical Chemistry

    Nanowire Spectroscopy

    I’ve said this before, but if I had to pick one general feature of the current scientific literature versus that of (say) 30 years ago, I would vote for the ability to obtain data at far smaller scales (higher resolution) and the corresponding ability to more fully characterize structures and species that are far larger… Read More
  • Chemical Biology

    Probes For Everything

    In case you don’t know, there’s officially an effort to try to develop chemical probes for basically every protein in the human proteome. The “Target 2035” initiative has been looking through the literature and finding what you’d expect: power-law distributions that have most people working on proteins that other peopl… Read More
  • Biological News

    And Now For A Bit of Quantum Mechanics

    OK, today’s blog post is going to be even weirder than usual – we’re going to wander off into quantum mechanics. And into a particular borderland of it where have been a lot of interesting hypotheses and speculations, but plenty of hand-waving hoo-hah, so it’s important to realize the risks up front. But here we go. Read More
  • Clinical Trials

    Quietly Another Drug Candidate Disappears

    I wanted to note something today that won’t make many headlines outside of biopharma, but it’s just the sort of story that I wish more people knew about. Let’s start with this: there’s a terrible disease called IPF, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Anyone with any medical background knows to beware the word “idiopathic&# Read More
  • Don’t Let Humans Pick the Experimental Conditions?

    When chemists have a wide range of reactants to choose from to make new compounds, how do they choose which ones to use? “Not randomly” is the answer, even when perhaps it should be. This effect has been noted in medicinal chemistry, where the choice of building blocks (not to mention reactions) for analog synthesis… Read More
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